Saving Eggs before Blocking Puberty: Why “Transition” If Still Uncertain?

Through Catholic Lenses | 3/19/2019 | Staff
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A recent report came out about a young woman who thinks she is a man so will be blocking puberty. However, her parents decided to wait until her first period before blocking puberty, and collect her eggs to freeze at that moment. I want to examine this and the moral consequences.

MedicalXpress summarizes the story of this patient:

Transgender - Boy - Puberty

You’re a 14-year-old transgender boy who has opted to block normal female puberty before it can begin.

What happens if you and your parents decide to preserve some of your eggs, in case you want to have children later in life?

Case - Doctors - Eggs - Patient - Girl

In this real-life case, doctors were able to retrieve and freeze four viable eggs from the patient, who was born a girl, but identified as male. The findings were published in a report in the Feb. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Preservation of fertility is a choice that transgender teens must struggle with as they undergo hormone therapy to align their bodies with their sexual identities.

Doctors - Issue - Counsel - Transgender - Patients

Doctors are encouraged to bring up the issue as they counsel adolescent transgender patients, [Selma] Witchel said.

“I’m seeing more and more youth with gender dysphoria,” Witchel said. “Most of them are not thinking ahead of the future and they themselves aren’t interested in fertility preservation. Their parents are, but the teenager generally is not.”

Article - Implies - States - Reality - Forms

This whole article implies, but barely states, the reality that most forms of hormonal or surgical gender reassignment render the patient sterile. Transpersons after surgery are always sterile, and others with significant hormones generally are often also sterile. Another expert, Dr. Joshua Safer, admits this in the article, “The current treatment options can put fertility at risk.”

Even with the frozen eggs, if this patient later undergoes a hysterectomy, they will be sterile even with IVF. As Witchel explains above, this is something rarely discussed...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Through Catholic Lenses
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