The Inventor: If You Think Elizabeth Holmes Has Been Keeping a Low Profile, You're Wrong

POPSUGAR Entertainment | 3/18/2019 | Corinne Sullivan
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Following a pair of notable Fyre Festival docs, the latest millennials-meet-true-crime documentary is HBO's The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley, which revolves around the failed blood-testing startup Theranos and its founder Elizabeth Holmes. Building upon the book published last year by Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou, Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup, the documentary (which premieres March 18) will tell the story of the brilliant Stanford dropout who promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing much faster and easier and who received billions of dollars through fundraising efforts — which would have been great if the technology actually existed.

When Holmes first appeared on the scene in 2004 with her mission of performing blood tests using only small quantities of blood, she and her new company, Theranos (a name created by combining "therapy" and "diagnosis"), received an impressive amount of interest. By 2015, Forbes even recognized Holmes as the youngest self-made female billionaire in America (though she would later be dethroned by Kylie Jenner).

End - Year - Carreyrou - Investigation - Theranos

However, towards the end of that same year, a suspicious Carreyrou launched a secret investigation of Theranos after speaking with a medical expert who questioned the legitimacy of this miracle blood-testing device. The publication of his explosive WSJ article "Hot Startup Theranos Has Struggled With Its Blood-Test Technology" marked the beginning of the end for Holmes and her company.

Related:

Fyre - Media - CEO - Billy - McFarland

Just like with Fyre Media's CEO Billy McFarland, the most fascinating thing about Holmes is the extent of her deception. After all, the now-35-year-old somehow convinced Stanford scientists to believe her...
(Excerpt) Read more at: POPSUGAR Entertainment
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