The sad reason part of the Mars Rover's last image is black and white

Popular Science | 6/10/2018 | Staff
Matty123 (Posted by) Level 3
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Unfortunately, the final frames needed to figure out the last bits of color in the panorama never made it back to earth.

This method for capturing photos sounds complex, but this process is actually extremely similar to the way in which almost all modern digital cameras work. Each pixel on the sensor inside your smartphone camera, for instance, sits behind a filter that’s either red, green, or blue. Those filters are arranged in a pattern typically known as the Bayer pattern. When you snap a photo, the camera knows how much light each image received and what color filter it passed through and it uses that information to “debayer” the image and give it its colors....
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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