After days of backlash, a video game about rape has been pulled from the world's biggest PC gaming store for posing 'unknown costs and risks'

Business Insider | 3/6/2019 | Kevin Webb
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Steam is no longer planning to allow the controversial video game "Rape Day" to be released on its PC gaming platform.

The game, created by indie developer Desk Plant, was originally scheduled for an April release on Steam.

Day - Novel - Images - Violence - Women

"Rape Day" is a visual novel featuring still images of graphic sexual violence against women; the game was available for preview on Steam for three weeks with 25 screenshots that included scenes of rape and women held at gunpoint.

Following public backlash, Steam released a statement saying "Rape Day" will not ship on Steam due to "unknown costs and risks." The company maintains that it will continue to review controversial games on a case-by-case basis to protect the interests of developers.

Steam - Platform - PC - Gaming - Rape

Steam, the most popular platform for PC gaming, will no longer release "Rape Day," a controversial video game from indie developer Desk Plant centered around committing sexual violence against women. While the game was viewable in the Steam store for weeks and was scheduled for an April 2019 release, Steam now says "Rape Day" presents "unknown costs and risks" to its business.

In the past, Steam has been vocal about its desire to protect the free speech interests of the developers who release their games on the platform. Last year, after pulling a game called "Active Shooter" that simulated a school shooting, Steam said it would strive to allow any game on the platform regardless of content, so long as it wasn't "illegal, or straight up trolling."

Creator - Rape - Day - Desk - Plant

The creator of "Rape Day," Desk Plant, said they followed Steam's policies and disclosed the game's offensive content before it was listed in the store. Like other games with sexual content, "Rape Day" was hidden from Steam's usual search results, but searching the exact title, or the word rape alone, would allow users to see and access the game's Steam...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Business Insider
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