Correction: Grab And Go Shopping story

ABC News | 2/18/2019 | Staff
Nighty (Posted by) Level 3
In a story Feb. 8 about retailers adopting technology to allow shoppers to buy goods without waiting in line, The Associated Press misspelled the name of a provider of checkout-free shopping technology. The company is Grabango, not Grabandgo.

A corrected version of the story is below:

SAN - FRANCISCO - AP - Get - Riddance

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Get ready to say good riddance to the checkout line.

A year after Amazon opened its first cashier-less store, startups and retailers are racing to get similar technology in stores throughout the world, letting shoppers buy groceries without waiting in line.

Stores - Time - Money - Merchants - Customers

If they work, cashier-less stores will not only save time but maybe money too, for both cost-cutting merchants and customers whose shopping habits are dissected.

From cameras and sensors, the stores will know when shoppers pick up a product and put it down, and can send them a discount to tempt them to buy it. Merchants will be able to create more space for merchandise, better track when shelves need replenishing and draw more business from the hordes of customers who detest long lines.

Monitoring - System - Technology - Privacy - Issues

But the monitoring system underlying cashier-less technology is bound to raise new privacy issues and worries about customer data falling into the wrong hands, especially if stores deploy facial recognition software in the omnipresent cameras watching shoppers.

"It could be scary, and it could be creepy," says Peter Trepp, CEO of FaceFirst, a Los Angeles company that so far has only sold its facial recognition tools to retailers trying to identify shoplifters and other criminals. "But if it's used to give people a 30 percent coupon on something they want that is going to be a nice benefit. That kind of experience will help people embrace the technology."

Amazon - Start - US - Convenience - Stores

Amazon has a head start in the U.S., opening 10 convenience stores in three cities: Chicago, San Francisco and Seattle. The stores sell salads and...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ABC News
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