Social media doesn't need new regulations to make the internet safer – General Data Protection Regulation can do the job

phys.org | 2/14/2019 | Staff
jesse456 (Posted by) Level 3
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From concerns about data sharing to the hosting of harmful content, every week seems to bring more clamour for new laws to regulate the technology giants and make the internet "safer". But what if our existing data protection laws, at least in Europe, could achieve most of the job?

Germany has already started introducing new legislation, enacting a law in 2018 that forces social media firms to remove hateful content. In the UK, the government has proposed a code of practice for social media companies to tackle "abusive content". And health secretary Matt Hancock has now demanded laws regulating the removal of such content. Meanwhile, deputy opposition leader Tom Watson has suggested a legal duty of care for technology companies, in line with recent proposals by Carnegie UK Trust.

Proposals - EU - General - Data - Protection

What's notable about many of these proposals is how much they reference and recall the EU's new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Hancock, who led the UK's introduction of this legislation (though he has also been accused of a limited understanding of it) referred to the control it gives people over the use of their data. Watson recalled the level of fines imposed by GDPR, hinting that similar penalties might apply for those who breach his proposed duty of care.

The Carnegie proposals, developed by former civil servant William Perrin and academic Lorna Woods, were inspired by GDPR's approach of working out what protective measures are needed on an case-by-case basis. When a process involving data is likely to pose a high risk to people's rights and freedoms, whoever's in charge of the process must carry out what's known as a data protection impact assessment (DPIA). This involves assessing the risks and working out what can be done to mitigate them.

Thing - Data - Protection - Laws

The important thing to note here is that, while earlier data protection laws largely...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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