Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction

ScienceDaily | 2/12/2019 | Staff
MonkeyBubble (Posted by) Level 3
"Aging has become the next frontier in medicine," said sleep specialist David Gozal, MD, chair of the Department of Child Health at the University of Missouri School of Medicine.

Chronological age -- the passing of time one spends on this planet -- cannot be reversed, Gozal said. However, biological age -- one's health relative to that of one's peers -- can be turned back. Healthy lifestyle habits contribute to "aging well," meaning one's biological age is younger than one's chronological age, Gozal said. And sleep is a major factor in how well one ages.

Study - Sleep - Apnea - Inflammation - Proof

In the study, "Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Inflammation: Proof of Concept Based on Two Illustrative Cytokines," published recently in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, researchers examined the link between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and inflammation and the ensuing damage caused to organs. They concluded that OSAS promotes a persistent low-intensity inflammatory state.

Gozal and Leila Kheirandish-Gozal, MD, director of the MU School of Medicine's Child Health Research Institute, make the case that sleep-disordered breathing such as OSAS should be viewed as a low-grade chronic inflammatory disease. That's because OSAS often leads to altered lung ventilation and low concentrations of oxygen in the blood, which can trigger inflammation.

Inflammation - Changes - Neurocognition - Mood - Behavior

Inflammation is associated with changes in neurocognition, mood, behavior, cardiovascular function and metabolism, as well as a host of related conditions including chronic kidney disease, erectile dysfunction, eye disease and cancer.

In their study, Kheirandish-Gozal and...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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