Higher sodium intake associated with increased lightheadedness in the context of the DASH-sodium trial

ScienceDaily | 2/8/2019 | Staff
newusr01 (Posted by) Level 3
However, contrary to this recommendation, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) found that higher sodium intake, when studied in the context of the DASH-Sodium trial (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), actually increases lightheadedness. These findings challenge traditional recommendations to increase sodium intake to prevent lightheadedness. The study appeared today in the Journal of Clinical Hypertension.

"Our study has real clinical and research implications," said Stephen Juraschek, MD, PhD, the study's corresponding author and a primary care physician at BIDMC. "Our results serve to caution health practitioners against recommending increased sodium intake as a universal treatment for lightheadedness. Additionally, our results demonstrate the need for additional research to understand the role of sodium, and more broadly of diet, on lightheadedness."

Researchers - Data - DASH-Sodium - Trial - Crossover

The researchers used data from the completed DASH-Sodium trial, a randomized crossover study that looked at the effects of three different sodium levels (1500, 2300, and 3300 mg/d) on blood pressure. All participants ate each of the three sodium levels in random order for four weeks. Half of the participants ate the sodium levels in the context of a typical American diet (a control diet) while the other half ate the sodium levels consistent with DASH diet guidelines. The original trial showed that by lowering sodium, blood pressure was also lowered -- and was the basis for current guidelines for sodium consumption. The study also asked people to rate their experience of lightheadedness when they stood up, although these data were never reported. As such, in this secondary analysis of the DASH-Sodium trial, the researchers examined the impact of increased sodium intake on postural lightheadedness.

The study's findings suggest...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
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