Core technology for ultra-small 3-D image sensor

phys.org | 2/8/2019 | Staff
ridge-khridge-kh (Posted by) Level 4
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A KAIST research team developed a silicon optical phased array (OPA) chip, which can be a core component for three-dimensional image sensors. This research was co-led by Ph.D. candidate Seong-Hwan Kim and Dr. Jong-Bum You from the National Nanofab Center (NNFC).

A 3-D image sensor adds distance information to a two-dimensional image, such as a photo, to recognize it as a 3-D image. It plays a vital role in various electronics including autonomous vehicles, drones, robots, and facial recognition systems, which require accurate measurement of the distance from objects.

Automobile - Drone - Companies - Image - Sensor

Many automobile and drone companies are focusing on developing 3-D image sensor systems, based on mechanical light detection and ranging (LiDAR) systems. However, it can only get as small as the size of a fist and has a high possibility of malfunctioning because it employs a mechanical method for laser beam-steering.

OPAs have gained a great attention as a key component to implement solid-state LiDAR because it can control the light direction electronically without moving parts. Silicon-based OPAs are small, durable, and can be mass-produced through conventional Si-CMOS processes.

Development - OPAs - Issue - Beam-steering - Transversal

However, in the development of OPAs, a big issue has been raised about how to achieve wide beam-steering in transversal and longitudinal directions. In the transversal direction, a wide beam-steering has been implemented, relatively easily, through a thermo-optic or electro-optic control of the phase shifters integrated with a 1D array. But the longitudinal beam-steering has been remaining as a technical challenge since only a narrow steering was possible with the same 1D array by changing the wavelengths of light, which is hard to implement...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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