Engineers develop novel strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles for wide-ranging applications

phys.org | 1/25/2019 | Staff
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Two-dimensional (2-D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) nanomaterials such as molybdenite (MoS2), which possess a similar structure as graphene, have been donned the materials of the future for their wide range of potential applications in biomedicine, sensors, catalysts, photodetectors and energy storage devices. The smaller counterpart of 2-D TMDs, also known as TMD quantum dots (QDs) further accentuate the optical and electronic properties of TMDs, and are highly exploitable for catalytic and biomedical applications. However, TMD QDs is hardly used in applications as the synthesis of TMD QDs remains challenging.

Now, engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a cost-effective and scalable strategy to synthesise TMD QDs. The new strategy also allows the properties of TMD QDs to be engineered specifically for different applications, thereby making a leap forward in helping to realise the potential of TMD QDs.

Synthesis - TMD - Nanomaterials - Approach - TMD

Current synthesis of TMD nanomaterials rely on a top-down approach where TMD mineral ores are collected and broken down from millimetre to nanometre scale via physical or chemical means. This method, while effective in synthesising TMD nanomaterials with precision, is low in scalability and costly as separating the fragments of nanomaterials by size requires multiple purification processes. Using the same method to produce TMD QDs of a consistent size is also extremely difficult due to their minute size.

To overcome this challenge, a team of engineers from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NUS Faculty of Engineering developed a novel bottom-up synthesis strategy that can consistently construct TMD QDs of a specific size, a cheaper and more scalable method than the conventional top-down approach. The TMD QDs are synthesised by reacting transition metal oxides or chlorides with chalogen precursors under mild aqueous and room temperature conditions. Using the bottom-up approach, the team successfully synthesised a small library of seven TMD QDs...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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