Multiple sclerosis treatments delay progression of the disease

ScienceDaily | 1/17/2019 | Staff
The Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne-led study is the first to provide evidence that the currently available therapies can delay progression of disability in Multiple Sclerosis. It showed that early treatment -- particularly within five years of onset -- delayed the secondary progressive stage of MS, which is characterised by an ongoing increase of disability.

It showed that early treatment -- particularly within five years of onset -- delayed the secondary progressive stage of MS, which is characterised by an ongoing increase of disability.

Australians - MS

Currently, more than 23,000 Australians are living with MS.

The conversion to the secondary progressive stage of MS is characterised by worsening of physical and mental capacity and reduced quality of life.

Capability - Progression - Disability - Outcome - People

Therefore, the capability to delay this progression of disability represents an important outcome for people living with multiple sclerosis.

The results of the study were published in the international medical journal, JAMA.

Study - Clinical - Outcomes - Research - Unit

The study was led by the Clinical Outcomes Research unit (CORe) at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne in collaboration with the University of Cambridge.

The international study used data from 1555 patients, from 68 neurological clinics across 21 countries.

Study - Associate - Professor - Tomas - Kalincik

One of the study leads, Associate Professor Tomas Kalincik, head of the MS Service at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and CORe at the University of Melbourne, said that the study showed...
(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!