The world's oldest, deepest lake is full of life. Humans are changing that.

Popular Science | 1/16/2019 | Staff
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Lake Baikal is the world’s oldest and deepest lake. It’s at least 20 million years old, and roughly a mile deep at its lowest point. The Siberian lake contains holds more water than all the North American Great Lakes combined, what amounts to more than one-fifth of all the water found in lakes, swamps and rivers. It was formed by the shifting of tectonic plates, which created a valley that filled with water. That shift continues today at a rate of around 1 to 2 centimeters year, meaning the world’s biggest lake is only getting bigger.

What’s more, Lake Baikal — the name means “nature lake” in Mongolian — is rich in oxygen from top to bottom, meaning life can thrive in its furthest depths. In most deep lakes, the lower waters are absent...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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