NEW ENGINES HELP BOOST HIRING FOR GE RIVER WORKS PLANT

Itemlive | 1/11/2019 | Thor Jourgensen
penaert (Posted by) Level 3
Click For Photo: https://www.itemlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/T408-with-assembler-e1547253075517.jpg

LYNN — Like an island bathed in sunshine but surrounded by stormy seas, General Electric Aviation’s River Works plant is hiring at record levels and shouldering big aviation contracts even as GE works its way out of a corporate slide.

Company executives hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony a month ago to inaugurate the River Works assembly and shipping area for the new T408 helicopter engine.

Ceremony - GE - Aviation - Success - Production

The ceremony capped off GE Aviation’s success in landing a $143 million initial production contract in 2017 to build 22 engines to power a new Marine Corps heavy-lift helicopter.

State Rep. Peter Capano retired from a 29-year career with GE last week and said the T408 production spooling up this year is just the latest chapter in a River Works success story written since 2017.

Company - People - Year - Half - Time

“The company has hired more than 400 people over the last year and a half. The last time I heard of that happening was the 1970s,” Capano said.

River Works management and union employees are looking beyond the T408 to competing for the Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP) contracts to power U.S. Army Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The competition pits GE Aviation against a combined effort by aviation engine manufacturers Pratt & Whitney and Honeywell to grab the ITEP work.

Capano - River - Works - Generation - Helicopter

Capano is confident the River Works could be building the next generation helicopter engine for the military.

“Aviation is doing good and Lynn stands to do well,” he said.

GE - Stock - Performances - Turnover - Executives

GE saw poor stock performances in 2017 and 2018 and a turnover in its top executives with current CEO Larry Culp on the job for three months.

Dr. Lawrence Davis, chairman of the history, government and economics departments at North Shore Community College, said it is not unusual for one division of a major corporation to do well while the corporation as a whole does poorly.

Peak - Combat

He said the peak combat...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Itemlive
Wake Up To Breaking News!
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!