This robot plants heat-resistant corals to save endangered reefs

Popular Science | 1/11/2019 | Staff
lhumara (Posted by) Level 3
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“We will be monitoring the survival and growth of juvenile corals as they appear on the reef,” Harrison said. “We should start to see juvenile corals after about 9 months when they grow large enough to become visible on the reef.”

Later this spring, the researchers plan to send the robot — with more larvae — to degraded reefs in the Philippines, then will aim for an even larger project on the Great Barrier Reef in late 2019.

Advantages - Robot - Growth - Reefs - Scientists

One of the advantages of the robot is that it can also monitor the growth of coral reefs, which will help scientists understand how they respond to the larval delivery. This will be critical to scaling up...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Popular Science
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