Canadian Telescope Finds 13 More Fast Radio Bursts Including the Second One Ever Seen Repeating

Universe Today | 1/9/2019 | Staff
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Canadian scientists using the CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) have detected 13 FRBs (Fast Radio Bursts), including the second-ever repeating one. And they think they’ll find even more.

CHIME is an innovative radio telescope in the Okanagan Valley region in British Columbia, Canada. It was completed in 2017, and its mission is to act as a kind of time machine. CHIME will help astronomers understand the shape, structure, and fate of the universe by measuring the composition of dark energy.

CHIME - Design - Radio - Bursts

CHIME’s unique design also makes it well-suited for detecting fast radio bursts.

Fast radio bursts are high-energy events out in space that we detect as a transient pulse of radio waves. They usually only last a few milliseconds. Scientists aren’t sure exactly what their origin is, though it is definitely from outside the Milky Way. Some of the suggested sources are black holes or rapidly-rotating neutron stars.

Problem - Pieces - Puzzle

“We haven’t solved the problem, but it’s several more pieces in the puzzle.”

“Until now, there was only one known repeating FRB. Knowing that there is another suggests that there could be more out there. And with more repeaters and more sources available for study, we may be able to understand these cosmic puzzles—where they’re from and what causes them,” said Ingrid Stairs, a member of the CHIME team and an astrophysicist at UBC.

CHIME - Valley - Okanagan - Region - BC

CHIME is situated in a valley in the Okanagan region of BC. The surrounding mountains provide a “radio-quiet” setting where stray terrestrial radio signals are kept to a minimum. The setting helps CHUME detect fast radio bursts. Image Credit: CHIME Observatory.

The CHIME observatory has a unique design. Unlike other telescopes, which have moving mounts that allows them to reposition and to study specific objects in space, CHIME is statonary. CHIME sits still while the sky moves overhead. It maps the entire northern hemisphere every...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Universe Today
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