From a $300 breast massager to a pregnancy band: The future of parenting revealed at CES

Mail Online | 1/9/2019 | Associated Press;Cheyenne Macdonald For Dailymail.com In Las Vegas
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Every year, the CES gadget show brings more devices promising to make life a little bit easier for harried parents.

Sure, the kids might love them too: who wouldn't want a computerized Harry Potter wand that also teaches coding?

Las - Vegas - Tech - Sector - Products

The Las Vegas show's growing 'family tech' sector encompasses products that range from artificially intelligent toys and baby monitors to internet-connected breast pumps.

Among the standouts of this year's show was was a device designed to make breast pumping a smoother experience, complete with built-in breast massagers that can slash the total pumping time.

Imalac - Device - 'Nurture - Uses - Cups

Imalac's breast-massaging device 'Nurture' uses attachable cups to mimic hands-on pumping, according to the company's Kickstarter.

'Nurture will drastically improve the efficiency and ease of milk expression when used in conjunction with an electric breast pump,' the firm says.

Imalac - Device - Time - Percent - Amount

According to Imalac, the device can help to cut pumping time by more than 70 percent, and increase the amount of milk expressed by 30 percent.

Their common thread is an appeal to parental anxiety about raising smart kids, occupying their time, tracking their whereabouts and making sure they're healthy and safe.

Trade-offs - 'Technology - Life - Psychologist - Sherry

Some also come with subtle trade-offs. 'Technology makes us forget what we know about life,' said psychologist Sherry Turkle, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who studies people's relationships with machines.

She's particularly concerned about robots that seek to befriend or babysit young children.

Cute - Furry - Woobo - Version - Child

Take the cute, furry Woobo, meant to be a real-life version of a child's imaginary friend that can help set tooth-brushing routines, answer complex questions and play educational games.

It's part of a new cottage industry of sociable toys, which includes robots like Cozmo and Sony's dog-like Aibo.

Pull - Ears - Woobo - Mode - Toy

A gentle pull at the ears switches the screen-faced Woobo into listening mode. The $149 toy talks in a child-like voice and makes a game out of boring chores...
(Excerpt) Read more at: Mail Online
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