Engineers identify improved membranes to capture CO2 at coal-fired power plants

phys.org | 1/8/2019 | Staff
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A computational modeling method developed at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering may help to fast-track the identification and design of new carbon capture and storage materials for use by the nation's coal-fired power plants. The hypothetical mixed matrix membranes would provide a more economical solution than current methods, with a predicted cost of less than $50 per ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) removed.

The research group—led by Christopher Wilmer, assistant professor of chemical and petroleum engineering, in collaboration with co-investigator Jan Steckel, research scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, and Pittsburgh-based AECOM—published its findings in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Energy & Environment Science ("High-throughput computational prediction of the cost of carbon capture using mixed matrix membranes").

Polymer - Membranes - Decades - Materials - Use

"Polymer membranes have been used for decades to filter and purify materials, but are limited in their use for carbon capture and storage," noted Dr. Wilmer, who leads the Hypothetical Materials Lab at the Swanson School. "Mixed matrix membranes, which are polymeric membranes with small, inorganic particles dispersed in the material, show extreme promise because of their separation and permeability properties. However, the number of potential polymers and...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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