Can I get hold of my private hospital records? Dr Martin Scurr answers your health questions 

Mail Online | 1/8/2019 | Dr Martin Scurr For The Daily Mail
townskey13 (Posted by) Level 3
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Is one entitled to one’s health records from a private hospital? I am now retired and can no longer afford private health cover. I’m being treated on the NHS for a heart condition and would like my private records to be made available to the NHS.

Keith Basson, Warrington.

Word - Data - Records - Data - Hospital

In a word: yes. The data held in your records is your data and both the private hospital where you were treated and the practitioner who treated you are legally obliged to provide you with that information.

It is possible that part of your records is held at the hospital, while your consultant will also have copies of some of your data — and there may also be a degree of duplication.

Event - Request - Writing - Records - Officer

In any event, make your request in writing, initially to the medical records officer at the hospital.

A full set of records will include reports of investigations such as X-rays and other scans and laboratory tests, as well as clinical notes from your doctors.

Notes - File - Letter - Consultant - Copy

If there are no notes in the file when you receive it, write a letter to the consultant to request a copy of the notes he holds.

You may also be requested to collect the files, rather than entrust them to the post. Most facilities will not send such documentation by email on account of the need for confidentiality and the potential problem of them being hacked. When it comes to getting hold of NHS hospital records, contact the records manager, or patient services manager, at your hospital trust.

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