High stakes, entrenched interests and the Trump rollback of environmental regulations

phys.org | 11/13/2018 | Staff
Click For Photo: https://3c1703fe8d.site.internapcdn.net/newman/gfx/news/hires/2018/trump.jpg

Since his days on the campaign trail, President Donald Trump has promised to roll back environmental regulations, boost the use of coal and pull out of the Paris climate agreement—and he's moving toward doing all those things.

He has pushed ahead with such action even as a report by the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in October concluded that without much stronger measures to reduce the use of fossil fuels, a warming planet will witness the spread of tropical diseases, water shortages and crop die-offs affecting millions of people.

Supporters - Administration - Changes—some - Administration - Moves

Supporters of the administration's changes—some of whom are skeptical of accepted science—say the administration's moves will save money, produce jobs and give more power to states.

But critics say new strictures on scientific research and efforts to overturn standards for protecting air, water and worker safety could have long-term, widespread effects that would upend hard-won gains in environmental and public health.

Trump - Administration - Proposals - Target - Reach

The Trump administration's many environmental proposals vary widely in target and reach.

For example, the administration has delayed the implementation and enforcement of many Obama-era rules, saying they need time to draw up new rules or study some that are already on the books. Industry generally agrees, arguing these rules are an overreach with negative financial consequences. Critics fear that the delays will undermine hard-fought public health protections.

Efforts

Among such efforts:

The Environmental Protection Agency recently argued it needs until 2020 to decide on a controversial Obama-era directive expanding to smaller streams and waterways the types of wetlands protected by the federal Clean Water Act. That directive might mean fewer pollutants released into tributaries of larger waterways, from which millions of people get their drinking water. But the controversial rule has been fought by farming, mining and other industry groups that say it is too restrictive.

EPA

The EPA also sought to delay by nearly two...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
Wake Up To Breaking News!
The beatings will continue until moral improves.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to Long Room!

Where The World Finds Its News!