Wild African monkeys infected with the bacterium causing yaws in humans 

phys.org | 9/21/2018 | Staff
j.moomin (Posted by) Level 3
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An international research team, led by scientists from the German Primate Center, the Robert Koch Institute, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, McGill University, Masaryk University, the University of Tübingen and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has successfully recovered genomes of the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis and yaws in humans, from wild nonhuman primate populations across sub-Saharan Africa. Monkeys showed severe symptoms including lesions on their genitals, face, and extremities. The pathogen's genomes revealed that nonhuman primates across a large geographic range are infected with the same bacterium causing yaws in humans.

Co-lead author Sascha Knauf of the German Primate Center suggests that "the World Health Organization's efforts to eradicate human yaws must continue, but our finding of the widespread distribution of this pathogen in nonhuman primates calls for even more rigorous post-eradication surveillance in countries where nonhuman primates and humans coexist."

Yaws - Bacterium - Treponema - Pallidum - Subsp

Yaws is caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue, which is closely related to the bacterium causing the venereal disease syphilis, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Yaws is characterized by lesions of the skin, bones and cartilage and when untreated, can lead to disfigurement, disability, and sometimes death. It is thought to be primarily spread by skin to skin contact from human to human and despite the availability of effective antibiotics, yaws continues to affect thousands of people annually across at least 14 countries in the tropics, predominantly children. "The bacteria responsible for yaws were long thought to mainly infect humans, but this new research confirms that this is not the case," says co-lead author Verena Schuenemann of the University of Tübingen.

The international team first collected samples from sick wild monkeys in Tanzania, the Gambia, Senegal and the Côte d'Ivoire. These bacteria are extremely difficult...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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