Modified superconductor synapse reveals exotic electron behavior

phys.org | 9/18/2018 | Staff
boti (Posted by) Level 3
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Electrons tend to avoid one another as they go about their business carrying current. But certain devices, cooled to near zero temperature, can coax these loner particles out of their shells. In extreme cases, electrons will interact in unusual ways, causing strange quantum entities to emerge.

At the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), a group, led by Jimmy Williams, is working to develop new circuitry that could host such exotic states. "In our lab, we want to combine materials in just the right way so that suddenly, the electrons don't really act like electrons at all," says Williams, a JQI Fellow and an assistant professor in the University of Maryland Department of Physics. "Instead the surface electrons move together to reveal interesting quantum states that collectively can behave like new particles."

States - Feature - Quantum - Computers - Imperfections

These states have a feature that may make them useful in future quantum computers: They appear to be inherently protected from the destructive but unavoidable imperfections found in fabricated circuits. As described recently in Physical Review Letters, Williams and his team have reconfigured one workhorse superconductor circuit—a Josephson junction—to include a material suspected of hosting quantum states with boosted immunity.

Josephson junctions are electrical synapses comprised of two superconductors separated by a thin strip of a second material. The electron movement across the strip, which is usually made from an insulator, is sensitive to the underlying material characteristics as well as the surroundings. Scientists can use this sensitivity to detect faint signals, such as tiny magnetic fields. In this new study, the researchers replaced the insulator with a sliver of topological crystalline insulator (TCI) and detected signs of exotic quantum states lurking on the circuit's surface.

Physics - Student - Rodney - Snyder - Author

Physics graduate student Rodney Snyder, lead author on the new study, says this area of research is full of unanswered questions, down to the actual process for integrating...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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