Bold visions will bring permanent peace to the Korean Peninsula

The Globe and Mail | 6/26/2018 | Staff
Pumpkinajn (Posted by) Level 3
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Brian Mulroney is a former prime minister of Canada.

“Re-engineering Peace for Asia” is an objective that is very much at the centre of world attention these days, and for good reason.

Singapore - Summit - Leaders - United - States

The Singapore Summit was historic if only because it brought together the leaders of the United States and North Korea for the very first time. If you believe, as I do, that personalities can influence the direction of world affairs, you will undoubtedly agree that there is now hope that this beginning will create momentum for change and for re-engineering peace on the Korean Peninsula and the Asian region. Just imagine what a lasting peace would mean for the world as a whole.

Canada has a proud history of engagement – military, diplomatically and economically – with South Korea. The Korean War was one of the most significant chapters in Canada’s illustrious military and peacekeeping history. More than 26,000 Canadians served on land, sea and in the air during this bitter conflict, along with many others from 17 UN member states, most notably the United States. All operated under a formal UN mandate.

Total - Canadians - Sacrifice - Conflict - Monuments

A total of 516 Canadians paid the ultimate sacrifice during the conflict. There are poignant monuments to their memory both in Ottawa and in Busan, not far from Jeju-do – where more than 300 Canadians are buried. Each monument depicts a volunteer Canadian solider and two South Korean children. The girl is holding a bouquet of maple leaves and the boy is holding a bouquet of maple leaves and roses of Sharon – South Korea’s national flower.

Before that conflict, Canada’s relations with Korea were quite limited, involving mainly missionaries teaching and providing health services. But, when the South was invaded in 1950, Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent promptly chose to honour our staunch commitment to the United Nations and...
(Excerpt) Read more at: The Globe and Mail
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