Marine reserves are vital—but under pressure

phys.org | 6/18/2018 | Staff
maye (Posted by) Level 3
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A massive study of nearly 1800 tropical coral reefs around the world has found that marine reserves near heavily populated areas struggle to do their job—but are a vast improvement over having no protection at all.

Professor Josh Cinner from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University led a team of 37 scientists examining the effectiveness of different reef conservation strategies.

Stocks - Reefs - Populations - Reserves - Pressures

"Fish stocks were extremely depleted on reefs that were accessible to large human populations. Compared to marine reserves far from these human pressures, reserves near high human pressure had only a quarter of the fish and were a hundred times less likely to have top predators such as sharks," said Professor Cinner.

The scientists also studied how differences in ecological conditions between marine reserves, where fishing is prohibited, and places open to fishing changed as human pressures increased. "This tells you where you can get the biggest impact from implementing conservation," said Professor Cinner.

Part - Study - Difference - Biomass - Reserves

"A really novel and exciting part of our study found that the greatest difference in fish biomass between marine reserves and places open to fishing was in locations with medium to high human pressure. This means that, for most fisheries species, marine reserves have the biggest bang where human pressures are medium to high," he said.

For example, on reefs subject to high human pressure, marine reserves had five times more fish than openly fished reefs—a benefit that can spillover into the depleted fisheries in surrounding areas.

Predators

"However, top predators...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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