Measuring the wear and tear of metals

phys.org | 7/8/2019 | Staff
darkkazunedarkkazune (Posted by) Level 3
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For the past 50 years, researchers at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) have been conducting detailed short- and long-term testing of a wide variety of structural materials manufactured in Japan to ensure they can withstand long-term stresses. Now, NIMS scientists have reviewed this data, in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, summarizing the institute's major findings.

In 1966, NIMS's predecessor, the National Research Institute for Metals, launched its "creep data sheet project." The aim of this project was to determine the stress required to rupture heat-resistant steels and alloys in 100,000 hours (about 11.4 years) at high temperatures. This "creep rupture strength" data was initially needed to determine the allowable stresses metals could be exposed to in power plants. But more recently, this data has been used to assess how much longer power plant parts have before they begin to wear and tear.

Decade - NIMS - Database - Fatigue - Properties

Just over a decade later, in 1978, NIMS also began assembling what has become a huge database of fatigue properties of structural materials used in numerous industries, including automobiles and aircrafts. Fatigue describes how cracks propagate in a metal over time. Fatigue tests involve placing a metal sample under repetitive loads, called cycles, to see how long it takes for a crack to develop and propagate. These tests are conducted at room temperature and high temperatures. Samples are exposed to a relatively small number of cycles (in the range...
(Excerpt) Read more at: phys.org
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